The Imaginary Revolution

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If you can imagine how something is possible there is always a chance that it will happen.  Even if the odds are significantly against it.  So imagine, if you will, a non-violent economic revolution…

How deep do I have to dig in order to explain the concept to the average reader? For me, at least, it is completely comprehensible. It seems so simple. All it has to do is unfold like a lotus flower. Why can’t everyone understand? It is a philosophical revolution. Collapse the old metaphor and replace it with a new one.  The “survival of the fittest”story is way too simplistic and one-sided.  Ecological interdependence is a much more realistic explanation of the observable world.   Down with the linear mechanical system that seeks only to win the competition and up with a dynamic organic system that seeks to live well within a healthy ecosystem.

Every cell is part of a tissue but is also an individual cell. Every tissue is part of a body, but is also an individual tissue. Every body is part of a community but is also an individual body. Every community is part of an ecosystem but is also an individual community. Every ecosystem is part of the whole planet earth but is also an individual ecosystem.

The dynamic relationship between the individual and the community. Therein lies the essence of free will. Therein lies the foundation for an economic system that makes sense. Communism/Socialism is a broken concept because it subordinates the individual instinct to the communal instinct. Capitalism/Corporatism is a broken concept because it subordinates the communal instinct to the individual instinct. Dynamic/Organic economics seeks the middle path between the two.

Capitalism is yang and Socialism is yin.
A healthy economic system is based upon the interdependence of both concepts.

Can you see the light yet?

Sometimes it acts like a particle and sometimes it acts like a wave.

Decentralize the power structures
And
Localize the economic system.

It’s not that complicated. Start with the first principle. A dynamic relationship between the individual and the community. Interdependence. Freequality. That is the foundation… the building block… The organizational structure (government) for a healthy community (state) grows out of that concept.

Dynamic/Organic Economics. (A Manifesto)

The first principle of organic economics is that all humans have an economic right to food, shelter and basic healthcare. Any government that does not guarantee those basic economic rights to all humans living within its jurisdiction is not a legitimate government.

It’s not welfare. It’s not an entitlement or a handout or charity. It’s a right. Everybody gets it. It’s your foundational bargaining position, human dignity, that allows you to participate in the free market.

The religion of capitalism is built completely upon the myth that the working class job seeker has bargaining position. But in reality, the worker does not have bargaining position. That is what the revolution is all about. If you guarantee economic rights you change the nature of the relationship between the employer and employee. The authoritarian hierarchy becomes a dynamic balance.

The theory of organic economics argues that the best way to give workers back their bargaining position/economic freedom is through the “democratization” of currency flows.

Presently, most, if not all, governments on the planet earth use some type of oligarchic linear money supply system. The currency supply is controlled by an elite central government and distributed to the population through a variety of trickle down mechanisms. In the US, they use a mechanism called fractional reserve banking. Private banks who borrow from the Fed are allowed to create money as credit and lend it out to people or institutions. In other words, when new money is added to the system, it is always given to people or institutions who have money in the first place. In other countries, the government or central bank creates the currency and passes it directly to its closest friends and relatives who then pass it down to the general population. Some governments may try to distribute currency in a way that is beneficial to the general population while some governments don’t seem to care about the populace at all. Either way, it is always a downward distribution from government insiders (bankers) to citizens.

In order to transform(revolutionize) the economic system, we must stop adding new money to the system through private banks. Outlaw fractional reserve banking. Private banks can only lend money they actually have. Instead, add new money to the system using the principles of organic economics.

In organic economics, all citizens have equal access to the circular flow of currency. Money is a function of the fair market value of food and shelter and basic healthcare within the jurisdiction that the money is distributed. It’s a mathematical equation with the community and the individual on opposite sides of the dynamic balance. There is no secret cabal of decision makers who get to decide who gets what. Money is automatically distributed according to the principles of the system. Every single person gets the exact same deal. You don’t borrow money from the oligarchy based upon your “credit rating”. You receive your fair democratic share of economic rights within the community/state where you live.

The formula itself is fairly simple. At the beginning of each month, each individual in the community/state is invested with the fair market value of food, shelter and basic healthcare in the currency of the community (how big the community? A small state? Hmm…). In exchange for that monthly investment, each individual agrees to respect the basic property rights (possessions) of other participants in the system and to contribute 50% of everything they earn (in whatever currency) on the free market back to the community/state at the end of each quarter or each year. The important thing is that money flows back and forth between community/state and individual as economic value is continually used and created.

In the confusing language of the punditocracy, you might say that everybody gets welfare (even billionaires)and everybody pays a 50% tax (even billionaires). But in organic economics, welfare is an investment in an individual and not a stigma because everyone gets it and taxes are a return to the community and not a punishment because they are based upon an agreement between people instead of imposed by psychopaths who want to fight more wars.

Do you get it yet? It makes sense. Economic democracy. Dynamic work relationships. Organic economics.

The non-violent economic revolution starts now!

This essay is not copyrighted, please feel free to share it or copy it or paste it or plagiarize it or send it to anyone and everyone.

Thanks, and have a wonderful day.

 

Not the Typical Indian Guru

Not the Typical Indian Guru

I never had a guru or spiritual leader or specific teacher whose message I follow.  Instead, many different humans have played that temporary role for me for brief periods of time.  This is the story of one of those people… and one of those brief periods of time.

I met Sunny at an outdoor café in Pushkar, India sometime around the turn of the century.  He was, perhaps, the wisest man I ever met.   I’m not sure if holy is the right word but he had that way about him… a sacred sort of presence.  I only knew him for about five days and I only talked with him at the café.  But we had several lengthy conversations over tchai and bhang lassis as we watched the crazy corner street traffic from our outdoor tables.  Truthfully, at the time, I didn’t put much importance on the conversations because I was distracted by a delightful little romance with a pretty young German woman.  But now, 15 years later, I’ve mostly forgotten the romance but I still think frequently about those conversations with Sunny.  I wonder why that is?

When I first saw him, it was kind of a mind twister.  I’d been traveling for several months around India but had only just arrived in Pushkar in the early morning.  As per my usual routine, I dropped my backpack in a cheap room and went looking for a centrally located café.  I found one on the corner of the main square and took a seat at an outdoor table.  That’s when I noticed two blonde haired backpacker guys sitting at the table across the aisle from me.  They were having a very animated discussion with an older local man.  The older man had long greasy grey hair, dark skin and shabby Indian clothes; he looked like he belonged in Pushkar.  He might even be a Sadhu except a real Sadhu would not be sitting in a café.   The strange thing was that the older guy answered the young guys back in their European language (Swedish, Dutch, or German?).  Not just a word or two, but full, complete and apparently complex sentences.  I remember even now how my brain was slightly confused by the situation because the language coming forth did not match the character speaking.

Later in the afternoon, on that same first day in Pushkar, I return to the centrally located café.  The house is packed this time and the server points me to the one empty seat.  I’ll be sharing a table with the strange older guy I saw in the morning.  He speaks to me in English.  It is one of the six languages he speaks.  He says his name is Sunny.

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